On June 12, 2020, we blogged about the so-called ag gag law enacted by the Arkansas legislature.  Animal rights organizations such as People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) or the Animal Legal Defense Fund (ALDF) often conduct undercover investigations of farms and ranches to uncover abusive practices and publicize them to the world.  A typical method for undercover investigation is to seek employment under false pretenses, then secretly film possible abuses.
Continue Reading Arkansas Ag Gag Update

On February 5, 2020, we blogged about the Kansas so-called “ag gag” law.  The objective of the statute is to discourage undercover scrutiny of agricultural facilities to obtain evidence of cruelty to animals, food safety violations, and other malfeasance and to broadcast that evidence to the public.  The Kansas statute accomplishes this by making it

On June 7, 2018, we blogged about the Fourth Circuit’s opinion reinstating challenges to North Carolina’s so-called “ag-gag” law. Such statutes are common. Their objective is to prevent undercover investigations of agricultural facilities designed to uncover and publicize abuse of animals. These statutes raise serious First Amendment issues and the courts have generally enjoined their enforcement, in whole or in part.
Continue Reading North Carolina Ag-Gag Law Update

We have on several occasions, most recently on February 5, 2020, blogged about so-called “ag gag” laws, statutes designed to prevent undercover investigations of agricultural producers. Since that post, the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Arkansas has dismissed plaintiffs’ challenge to the Arkansas statute for want of standing.
Continue Reading Ag-Gag Law Update

We have blogged, most recently on January 3, 2020, about the status of so-called “ag-gag” laws.  These laws are designed to prevent undercover scrutiny of agricultural operations to uncover cruelty to animals, food safety violations, or other malfeasance.  For the most part, courts have struck down these laws as infringing on the First Amendment.

On January 22, 2020, the United States District Court for the District of Kansas struck down most of Kansas’ ag-gag law as violative of the First Amendment.  This particular statute has been around since 1990, although there has never been any prosecution under it.


Continue Reading Ag-Gag Law Update

We blogged several times – most recently, on April 24, 2019 – about Iowa’s “ag-gag” law, which makes it a criminal offense to gain employment in or access to farm or ranch operations by means of false pretenses. The primary purpose of these kinds of statutes is to prevent undercover investigation of agricultural operations that engage in animal cruelty.

Continue Reading Iowa “Ag Gag” Law Update

On several occasions, the latest being March 27, 2019, we blogged about the Iowa “ag gag” law, which made it a criminal offense for persons to use false representations to gain access to farms and ranches for the purpose of exposing animal rights abuses. The District Court in Iowa held that the statute violated

On January 16, 2019, we blogged about the successful challenge to Iowa’s so-called Ag-Gag Law, designed to prevent undercover investigations of abusive farm practices. As expected, the state of Iowa has appealed that decision to the Eighth Circuit.

On January 16, 2018, we updated our blogging on so-called “ag-gag” laws – statutes designed to prevent undercover recording of unlawful practices on farms and processing centers. On September 15, 2017, we blogged about the Tenth Circuit’s partial overruling of the Utah statute.

The Supreme Court has now denied the cert. petition filed

On June 22, 2017 and September 15, 2017, we blogged about “ag-gag” laws – laws intended to prevent undercover access to agricultural production facilities for the purpose of finding and disclosing unethical behavior. These laws have met with varying fates in the federal courts.

In 2012, the Iowa legislature passed an ag-gag law,