We blogged on March 12, 2018, about the State of Iowa’s appeal of a District Court order finding that its so-called “ag-gag” statute violated the First Amendment.  The statute made it a criminal offense to gain access to farm facilities by false pretenses or to make a knowingly false statement in an employment application.  The purpose is to make it harder for undercover investigations to uncover animal abuse.

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We have blogged on several occasions, most recently on June 7, 2018, about the varied fate of so-called “ag-gag” laws. These laws seek to prevent, in one way or another, undercover investigations of the quality of producers’ facilities, usually involving care of animals or poultry.  On September 15, 2017, we blogged about the Tenth Circuit’s

On June 22, 2017, we blogged about the challenge to North Carolina’s “ag-gag” law. The statute provides for actual and punitive damages against a person or entity who engages in an undercover investigation into charges of animal cruelty.  People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) and the Animal Legal Defense Fund (ALDF) challenged the

On June 22, 2017, we blogged about the status of so-called “ag-gag laws” in various states. The purpose of such laws is to prevent undercover exposure of mistreatment of farm animals.  On July 7, 2017, a federal district court held that Utah’s ag-gag law violated the First Amendment.

The Utah statute criminalized four kinds of